Big Data Management = Big Demands on your IT Infrastructure

11th May 2018
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Big Data Management means Big Demands on your IT Infrastructure

While the concept of big data management is nothing new, the tools and technology needed to exploit “big data” for commercial and organisational gain are now coming to maturity. Businesses involved in industries such as media, hospitality, retail, leisure & entertainment, and manufacturing have long been dealing with data in large volumes and unstructured formats or data that changes in near real time.

However, extracting meaning from this data has often been prohibitive, requiring custom-built, expensive technology. Now, thanks to advancements in storage and analytics tools and technologies, all businesses and not for profit organisations can leverage big data to gain the insight needed to make their organisations more agile, innovative, and competitive.

At Wanstor, we understand there are a few important business drivers behind the growing interest in big data, which include:

  • The desire to gain a better understanding of customers
  • How to improve operational efficiency
  • The need for better risk management – Improved IT security and reduced fraud
  • The opportunity to innovate to stay ahead of the competition and/or attract/retain customers

In summary these business drivers are primarily the same goals that companies and not for profit organisations have had for years. But with advances in storage and analytics, they can now extract the value that lies within all of their existing data quicker, easier, and more cost-effectively.

At Wanstor we believe to turn these business goals into realities, business and not for profit organisations must think about data management in different ways. Because big data is voluminous, unstructured, and ever-changing, approaches to dealing with it differ from techniques used with traditional data. To turn big data into opportunities, organisations should take the time to find technology solutions that feature the following components:

  • A versatile, scale-out storage infrastructure that is efficient and easy to manage and enables business teams to focus on getting results from data quickly and easily
  • A unified analytics platform for structured and unstructured data with a productivity layer that enables collaboration between IT teams and the wider business
  • Capabilities to be more predictive, driving actions from actual insights

With these components in place, business and not for profit organisations can build infrastructures that deliver on the promises of big data.

Despite the many benefits it delivers, big data is (for many organisations) putting undue demands on their IT teams, as it differs from traditional enterprise data in the following ways:

  • It’s voluminous – Medium and large scale organisations generate and collect large quantities of traditional data, but big data is often orders of magnitude more.
  • It’s largely unstructured – Big data includes Internet log files, scanned images, video surveillance clips, comments on a website, biometric information, and other types of digitized information. This data doesn’t fit neatly into a database. But unstructured data accounts for 80%+ of all data growth in many businesses today.
  • It’s changing – Big data often changes in real time or near real time— E.g. customer comments on a website. This data must be collected over significant periods of time in order to spot patterns and trends.

Furthermore, organisations are beginning to realize that to reap the full value of big data, they must be able to analyse and iterate on the entire range of available digital information. One off snapshots of data do not necessarily tell the whole story or solve a particular business challenge. Efficiently collecting and storing that data for iterative analysis has a significant impact on an organisations storage and IT management resources. In short, IT storage professionals need to find big data solutions that fit the bill, but don’t strain already tight budgets or require significant investments in dedicated personnel.

Due to these new big data demands, as well as the importance of handling information correctly, most organisations consider managing data growth, provisioning storage, and performing fast, reliable, and iterative analytics to be top priorities. But as IT budgets have become squeezed many data storage professionals are saying to us at Wanstor that big data is placing their current IT infrastructures under extreme stress; with many looking to build scalable infrastructures within their data centres or outsource to a co-location or private cloud provider.

As you have probably guessed from the above paragraph big data requires more capacity, scalability, and efficient accessibility without increasing resource demands. Traditionally, storage architectures were designed to scale up to accommodate growth in data. Scaling up means adding more capacity in the form of storage hardware and silos, but it doesn’t address how additional data will affect performance. If you look at traditional storage architectures, RAID controller–based systems end up with large amounts of storage sprawl and create a siloed environment. Instead, organisations need to be able to achieve consolidation within a single, highly scalable storage infrastructure. They also need automated management, provisioning, and tiering functions to accommodate the rapid growth of big data.

At Wanstor we believe organisations of all sizes need storage architectures that are built with big data in mind and offer the following features:

  • Scalability – to accommodate large and growing data stores, including the ability to easily add additional storage resources as needed
  • High performance – to keep response times and data ingest times low, and can keep pace with the business
  • High efficiency – to reduce storage and related data centre costs
  • Operational simplicity – to streamline the management of a massive data environment without additional IT staff
  • Enterprise data protection – to make sure high availability for business users and business continuance in the event of a disaster
  • Interoperability – to integrate complex environments and to provide an agile infrastructure that supports a wide range of business applications and analytics platforms

Final thoughts – As the amount of unstructured data in organisations grow, companies and not for profit organisations of all sizes are learning they need new approaches to managing that data. At Wanstor we believe they require an efficient and scalable storage strategy that helps them to efficiently and effectively manage extreme data growth. Wanstor has a range of big data experts who can work with your business to put the right data storage solution that incorporates scalability, improved performance (both I/O and throughput), and improved data availability. Scalable storage solutions, paired with powerful analytics tools that can derive valuable insight from large amounts of content can help organisations of all sizes reap the benefits of “big data”. The only question you have to answer now is – Is your infrastructure ready?

For more information about Wanstor’s data storage solutions click here – https://www.wanstor.com/data-centre-storage-business.htm .

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Endpoint Security – A state of transition

19th April 2018
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Keyboard with sinister lighting

Endpoint security used to be a fairly mundane topic. The normal model used to be that the IT operations team would provision PCs with an approved image and then install Anti-Virus software on each system. The IT Operations team would then make periodic security updates (vulnerability scanning, patches, signature updates, etc.), but the endpoint security foundation was generally straightforward and easy to manage.

However in the last six months at Wanstor, we have seen an increase in the number of organisations increasing their focus on endpoint security and its associated people, processes, and technologies. This is largely down to mobility strategies starting to mature, BYOD becoming more common and mobile working the norm for many employees. Because of these market trends many businesses and not for profit organisations have had to increase their endpoint security budgets to cope with the changing working practices they are now facing.

The maturing of market trends have also meant many endpoint security vendors have had to change their strategies to cope with a transitioning end user workforce who want a stable office environment combined with a flexible work from anywhere approach.

At Wanstor we have seen the endpoint security strategy changing and predominantly being driven by the following factors in many organisations:

Cyber risks need to be addressed, especially around information security best practices – This is a clear indication that many IT security processes organisations have in place are not fit for a changing regulatory and mobile landscape.

Problems caused by the volume and diversity of devices – Addressing new risks associated with mobile endpoints should be a top endpoint security strategy requirement for all IT departments. This will only increase with the addition of more cloud, mobile, and Internet-of-Things (IoT) technologies

The need to address malware threats – Although it has been around for a long time many organisations are still struggling to get to grips with securing endpoints against malware threats. At Wanstor we do not find this overly surprising as the volume and sophistication of malware attacks has never been higher and the landscape is steadily becoming more dangerous. Additionally the sophistication and efficiency of the cybercriminal underworld alongside the easy access that would-be criminals have to sophisticated malware tools are a combination organisations of all sizes need to take seriously. At Wanstor we meet with 100’s of customers on a regular basis and they are all saying the same thing – We are concerned about our ability to stop these malware threats and stay a step ahead of attackers.

While various industry research studies suggest endpoint security strategies are driven by the factors identified above, many businesses and not for profit organisations still struggle to address endpoint security vulnerabilities and threats with legacy processes and technologies as well.

Some of the most common things we see at Wanstor include:

Security teams spending too much time concentrating on attacks which are happening now and not planning for the future – As the threat landscape has evolved so has the pressure on endpoint security staff, systems and processes. In many organisations they only have 1 or possibly 2 trained IT security professionals. This means when an attack happens they have to spend a lot of time attending to high-priority issues. They do not have sufficient time for process improvement or strategic planning. This challenge is something of a contradiction. Strategic improvements cannot and should not come at the expense of the security team failing to respond to high-priority issues, creating a quandary for many organizations: They know they need an endpoint security overhaul, but cannot afford to dedicate ample time at the expense of day-to-day security tactics. Effective endpoint tools must address this challenge by improving both the strategic and day-to-day position of the security team.

Organisations remain too focused/scared of regulatory compliance – At Wanstor we know it is a balance – IT security budgets vs regulatory compliance. However we have recently seen many businesses and not for profit organisations spending too much money/effort on becoming compliant within a changing regulatory landscape. Quite often this is because IT security teams have not worked with the business to properly define what the new regulations actually mean for the business and what the associated IT security spend should be. This often means IT security solutions are purchased ad-hoc and cost the organisation more money in the long run as they are purchased with a short term goal in mind rather than part of a wider security/regulatory plan.

At Wanstor we believe regulatory compliance should come as a result of strong security, and endpoint security cannot be achieved with a compliance-centric approach. For many IT teams this will mean a shift in thinking and closer working with other business departments such as the finance and legal teams.

Endpoint security has too many manual processes and controls – Endpoint security has undergone a major technical transition, but many organisations continue to rely on legacy products and processes to combat new challenges. It is often cheaper and easier for businesses and not for profit organisations to layer new products on top of legacy products as needs arise. However the trade-off is IT security teams become more and more inefficient as they have several layers of security processes and tools they have to manage which can create a security operations nightmare.

Wanstor’s Top Endpoint Security Challenges

  • Security staff spending a significant amount of time attending to high priority issues leading to no time for process improvement or strategic planning
  • Organisations too focused on meeting regulatory compliance requirements than addressing endpoint security risks with strong controls
  • Endpoint security is based upon too many manual processes making it difficult for the security staff to keep up to date with relevant security tasks and new technology trends
  • Organisations viewing endpoint security as a basic requirement and not giving it the time or resources it needs to protect users
  • Lack of monitoring of endpoint activities proactively so it can be difficult to detect a security incident.
  • Businesses and not for profit organisations not having access to the right vulnerability scanning and / or patch management tools so are always vulnerable to having an endpoint compromised by malware
  • Lack of budget to purchase the right endpoint security products as IT teams unsure of how to develop the right business case for management teams to make decisions on

In summary, Wanstor’s research of its own customers, and the changing mobility landscape identifies a situation where the principal endpoint security approach is not an adequate countermeasure for addressing the complexity and sophistication of modern IT security threats.

Wanstor’s own customer and market research evidence strongly suggests that businesses and not for profit organisations at the moment do not view existing endpoint security strategies as viable for blocking sophisticated attacks. As a result, many organisations need to supplement their existing endpoint security products with newer and more robust technologies that offer more functionality across incident detection, response, and remediation.

As a matter of course Wanstor believes all IT teams should take action now to review their endpoint security strategies and evaluate whether or not it is fit for purpose against business requirements. As a minimum the IT team should:

Investigate and test advanced anti-malware products – Organisations of all sizes should investigate and potentially acquire advanced anti-malware solutions. This is because normal solutions are no longer “good enough” to protect an organisation on their own. Instead IT teams need to recognise that all organisations are targets to hackers. In turn this means they should seek the strongest possible endpoint security solutions in order to deal with potential threats both now and in the future.

Continuous endpoint monitoring – As the great management saying goes “If you can’t manage it you can’t monitor it”. The question has to be: – Does your IT team have the right network and security monitoring in place? If it doesn’t how will you even know you are under attack or which endpoint devices are most vulnerable to attack? At Wanstor we always recommend appropriate network monitoring tools are purchased by the IT team. Quite often network monitoring and the ability to detect abnormal network traffic patterns early, help to prevent many security attacks before they become business critical.

Endpoint forensics – Endpoint forensic solutions can (when focused on actual need not cost) improve efficiency and effectiveness related to incident response, and reduce the time it takes for incident detection. Additionally by integrating endpoint data with network security analytics, it gives IT teams a more comprehensive and integrated view of security activities across networks and host systems.

In conclusion, endpoint security needs to change in most organisations to meet changing user needs and demands on IT. At the present time many organisations are struggling to hire the right staff, choose the right technologies, and respond to the many challenges of modern threats. The scale and diversity of these challenges can appear overwhelming, but organisations that take the time to devise and execute solid, integrated endpoint security strategies can the right returns on their security investments and protect their organisations at the same time.

Wanstor believes that organisations who are seeking to overhaul their endpoint security should integrate their endpoint security technologies with their network-level and log monitoring in order to improve incident detection, prevention, and response, while also streamlining the work of their security operations team.

For more information about Wanstor’s endpoint security services, please visit – https://www.wanstor.com/managed-it-security-services-business.htm

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Why flash storage is so important to the success of hybrid IT infrastructure

9th February 2018
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Why flash storage is so important to the success of hybrid IT infrastructure

IT leaders are facing critical decisions on how to best deploy data centre and cloud resources to enable digital transformation. The advantages of cloud models have been written about by many IT industry commentators, experts and opinion makers. Understandably, cloud computing is fundamental to delivering the agility, cost efficiencies and simplified operations necessary for modern IT workloads and applications at scale. However the truth is, even in today’s cloud era, IT leaders still need their own IT infrastructure and data centres to make IT work for their business.

At Wanstor, we believe that today and tomorrow’s data centres must support new models for resource pooling, self-service delivery, metering, elastic scalability and automatic chargebacks. They must deliver performance and agility that the business needs. No longer is it good enough to blame legacy IT equipment for standing in the way of business progress. IT departments must make sure they reduce complexity by leveraging technologies and architectures that are simple to deploy and manage. They must achieve levels of automation, orchestration and scalability that are not possible within data centres that operate on their own.

At Wanstor we have been thinking about the future of the data centre. We believe many IT departments are missing the fundamental question when seeking answers to their existing infrastructure plans and that is:

How does the data storage strategy integrate within existing and future company owned IT infrastructure and public cloud infrastructures?

At Wanstor we believe the answer to the “storage strategy” question can be found in a storage strategy that encompasses all flash and no longer relies on cumbersome disks and tapes. All-flash storage is the single most important change an IT Manager will need to make to successfully build their future hybrid infrastructure model. Without a flexible and scalable all-flash storage architecture the future data centre and hybrid cloud model actually fails. The performance, cost efficiencies, simplicity, agility and scalability the modern IT department will need to successfully serve their business cannot be achieved without all-flash storage as the infrastructure foundation.

So how do IT Managers leverage the benefits of all-flash storage to build a service-centric data storage infrastructure required for their business? What are some of the innovations in pricing models and all-flash storage architectures that will help them create a cost-efficient, scalable, resilient and reliable hybrid IT infrastructure?

The first thing IT Managers need to recognise is that moving to all-flash storage for a truly hybrid IT infrastructure is not just simply taking an extra step and buying some more kit nor is it rip everything out and start all over again. Instead it is an iterative process that will take place over a period of time depending on how mature a business’s IT infrastructure model is at the moment and what needs to be delivered by IT for business success in the future.

Migrating applications onto all flash storage

If you are an IT decision maker, you realise that your business has probably spent a quite a bit of budget and a significant amount of effort to make sure business critical applications are supported by an underlying IT infrastructure that is reliable, robust and resilient. Indeed you are probably beginning to experience performance challenges with a range of applications, particularly those that require high levels of IOPS. But applications and workloads that might see incremental improvements through faster, more responsive storage are unlikely to be the first place where IT will deploy all-flash systems. Instead, the IT Manager is likely to have specific applications and workloads where the performance challenges of spinning disk storage are difficult to overcome and the underlying storage infrastructure needs to be modernised instead to avoid putting the business at risk. Typical applications and workloads at this stage include databases supporting online transaction processing solutions for e-commerce, infrastructures supporting DevOps teams, and applications that are specific to a particular industry, which require levels of performance that traditional disk storage simply cannot deliver.

To understand which applications should be moved to all-flash storage first, it is important to do three things:

Understand the businesses own requirements for data storage, applications and budget considerations, and identify those workloads that are causing the most pain or providing the best opportunity to use all-flash storage to drive measurable business improvements.

Evaluate the benefits of all-flash storage solutions and how they can be applied to enhance and strengthen particular applications and workloads.

Compare leading all-flash solutions and determine which features, functions and pricing models will maximize the IT department’s ability to modernise workloads and begin a journey to an IT infrastructure model based around flash storage.

When evaluating the benefits of all flash storage, Wanstor believes IT Managers should consider the following critical factors:

Performance – All-flash storage will deliver performance that is at least 10 times greater than that of traditional disks. When thinking about performance, do not focus solely on IOPS; it is also about consistent performance at low latency. Make sure an all flash architecture is deployed that delivers consistent performance across all workloads and I/O sizes, particularly if starting with multiple workloads.

Total Cost of Ownership – The price of flash storage has come down dramatically in the past 12 months. If the IT and finance teams looked at flash several years ago and were scared off by the price, it is time to explore flash storage again. In fact some all flash storage providers have prices as low as £1k per TB of data.

Smaller storage footprint – This will happen through inline de-duplication and compression, along with thin provisioning, space-efficient snapshots and clones. In some cases the storage footprint can be reduced by a ratio of 5:1, depending upon the application and workload.

Lower operational overheads – Through faster more simple deployments, provisioning and scaling and cost savings as less manual maintenance is required.

Availability and resiliency – All-flash arrays utilise a stateless controller architecture that separates the I/O processing plane from the persistent data storage plane. This architecture provides high availability (greater than 99.999%) and non-disruptive operations. The IT Manager can update hardware and software and expand capacity without reconfiguring applications, hosts or I/O networks, without disrupting applications or sacrificing performance of the hardware.

Simpler IT operations – Many all-flash arrays are now plug and play, so simple that they can be installed in less than hour in many cases. Additionally storage administrators do not have to worry about configuration tuning and tweaking, saving hours or days of effort and associated expenses.

Consolidation – The next stage of moving more applications to flash storage

Once you have put your first applications on an all-flash storage array, the improvements in performance should be enough for the IT and finance teams to decide to invest further in the technology and really accelerate their journey to a flash storage based IT infrastructure.

Most IT leaders, will want to expand the benefits they will have seen from the initial deployment of flash storage to additional applications and workloads across the data centre. As the all-flash storage solution expands to additional applications, IT Managers will find that TCO benefits increase substantially. Because all-flash storage supports mixed workloads, IT Managers will be able to consolidate more applications on fewer devices, thus reducing IT infrastructure capital expenditure. By consolidating, IT Managers will also be able to maximize many of the cost savings mentioned earlier in this article (lower energy consumption, less floor space use, reduced software licensing fees etc).

In dense mixed workload applications, the TCO of using a flash storage solution will typically be 50% to 70% lower than a comparably configured traditional disk solution. Beyond the specific cost savings, the performance gains across more applications will drive significant business improvements and new opportunities. Resulting in a more agile IT infrastructure.

Additionally, the right all-flash storage architecture will help future-proof storage infrastructure, so that the investments being made today will continue to provide value as all flash storage usage is expanded across the business.

Building a business ready cloud on all flash storage

What do IT departments want and need from their cloud infrastructures? How can they leverage the cost savings and agility of the public cloud model, and link it to the control, security, data protection and peace of mind which can be achieved with an on-premises cloud infrastructure?

From Wanstor’s recent experiences many IT Managers want it all when it comes to cloud computing. They want to be able to provide all the features, functions and flexibility available from the leading public cloud service providers within their own IT infrastructure constraints. For many IT departments deploying cloud models similar to the big 3 cloud providers in a private cloud environment is simply unrealistic as the big 3 public cloud operators have lots of cash, resources and availability in terms of their infrastructure platforms.

If the IT department is unable to provide a better alternative to a public cloud solution, it is highly likely users within a business will feel the need to go to the public cloud. This creates a fertile ground for shadow IT initiatives that can cause security problems and other risks.

Beyond delivering public cloud-like features and functionality for an IT infrastructure solution, the IT department may also want to improve in areas where the public cloud may fall short. Performance is an example of this – If you want to use cloud services to support high-performance computing or big data analytics or some of the other important next-generation IT initiatives, it is likely the IT team will have to pay a premium to a public cloud service provider to match the businesses requirements.

Security is another critical area where building your own cloud infrastructure will give the IT department much greater control and peace of mind, particularly as they begin thinking about supporting the most important business applications and data in the cloud. As the IT department moves from the first all-flash applications through consolidation and toward the all flash cloud, an important step will be to bridge the virtualization gap between servers and the rest of the IT infrastructure, namely storage and networking.

To deliver a basic cloud-type service based on a flash storage platform, IT’s list of wants must include:

Shared resources through automated processes – Users should be able to go straight to an on-premises cloud and choose the storage capacity and performance they need, for as long as they need it.

Automated metering and charging – Once users have chosen the resources they want, the cloud infrastructure should be able to meter their usage and create an automated chargeback mechanism so they pay for what they actually used.

Scalability – Once resources are used, they go back into the pool and become available to other users and departments. As storage capacity and performance requirements grow, the storage platform should be simple to upgrade, update and scale. With virtualization across servers, storage and networking, an all-flash storage array becomes the foundation for a cloud infrastructure.

In this article we have discussed all-flash storage and the foundation it provides for a truly hybrid IT infrastructure to take place. Without the benefits of all-flash storage businesses will not be able to modernise their infrastructures to deliver cloud services. It is no coincidence that the largest cloud providers rely on all-flash storage solutions as their storage foundation. As discussed you can take the journey in stages, starting small with a single application or two, and then adding more applications through consolidation and virtualization. You can also implement multiple stages at once. Or you can do everything at once with all-flash storage solutions.

At Wanstor we believe the time for flash storage is now. The technology is great and at a price point where most businesses will see a return on their storage investments within 12 months due to the improved performance they receive across their business operations.

For more information about flash storage and how Wanstor can help your business with its IT infrastructure strategy and storage platforms, please visit https://www.wanstor.com/data-centre-storage-business.htm

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Reasons why business leaders need to consider outsourcing their IT service desk to a specialist provider

14th December 2017
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Service Desk Operatives smiling

At Wanstor we have recently been talking to a number of existing and potential customers about their IT service desk support. Our discussions have highlighted a number of major trends which IT departments and business leaders were not aware of putting pressure on IT service desk resources. For example:

  • Employees are more mobile than ever before, meaning things break at different locations
  • Employees attitudes to work are changing from a place where you go, to something you do as and when required
  • Different business departments wanting access to cloud services
  • More and more applications are being developed and used in day to day business
  • Data management becoming a serious headache as employees and customers demand access to it 24/7
  • More and more devices being used – leading to security and patch management issues in terms of the right levels of resourcing and making sure users are safe at all times from potential attacks
  • New technology and new devices are being launched all the time – What is the best way to offer support?
  • Growing operational costs of supporting a sprawling mixed vendor IT infrastructure
  • End users complaining about the time it takes to solve issues through the IT service desk

Traditional IT help desks used to service the business during opening hours and at fixed locations, however this is no longer good enough. IT support staff are now required to be multi skilled across a range of technologies and provide support to staff at different locations 24/7.

As business technology has become increasingly complex, the need for dedicated IT support services has grown. Typically the IT help desk has provided end users with little more than basic trouble shooting and issue management services. In the past when technology was made by only a few manufacturers, staff could easily be trained and appear knowledgeable about computers and IT infrastructure. However as business has become more reliant on technology, a standardised and documented helpdesk approach is needed, one which offers a consistent set of services and protocols for help desk staff. Over the past decade, IT help desk staff have started to become hindered by the sheer speed at which enterprise technology has evolved. There are a number of trends that have made it increasingly difficult for traditional IT help desks to provide the kinds of support that end users need:

These trends include:

  • Improvements in users personal IT has changed perceptions and expectations of what IT can help them with in their working lives. The user experience of smartphones and laptops is significantly better than even 5 years ago. What’s more, many of the leading technology providers provide consumers with a high standard of customer service (Just think of the apple store). So, when they call up their company’s IT service desk, they quickly become frustrated by untrained staff, staff who do not keep lines of communication open or inefficient processes which they have to go through to get a simple problem fixed.
  • Most of the modern workforce have been using advanced technology for the majority of their lives. Many employees are now capable of resolving minor troubleshooting problems and are also used to looking for answers online through search engines. Quite often, the IT help desk is a last resort for more complex problems, meaning IT help desk staff must be prepared to resolve more difficult issues.
  • As technology has evolved users are using a variety of software and applications in their business lives. Today, the typical business will be using 100’s of applications, with staff constantly connecting to the network with different kinds of personal and mobile devices. Expecting the service desk to monitor and support this complexity alone is problematic, as every user has a different IT need in terms of software and applications.
  • Employees want to work when they want to not when they are told to. This change in mindset with regards to work alongside the widespread acceptance of cloud technology and mobile devices, means business users are now able to access company content from their smartphones or laptops at any hour of the day. Most of the time this is hugely beneficial to the user and the company, allowing workers to be productive whilst out of the office. However, when they have problems logging onto the system, or syncing a document to their device, they need support instantly. When an IT help desk is closed at weekends or after 5pm, the service simply does not match up to user and business requirements.
  • More pressure is being placed on IT helpdesks. Staff turnover is constant as many internal IT helpdesk staff simply cannot cope with the demands being made of them. The HDI regularly states that the staff turnover rate on IT service desks is as high as 40% with many staff who do not leave complaining of stress and stress related illnesses. Such a high staff turnover means internal IT service desks often have extremely large training bills as they are constantly struggle to train and retain skilled staff members alongside many positions remaining unfilled.

The issues identified above have led many businesses to explore alternatives to the traditional in-house IT support approach. At Wanstor we believe the aim is not to replace the talent firms already have. Rather, the goal should be to extend and enhance in-house IT staff, by letting them focus their attention on high value strategic activities, whilst using a mix of outsourced staff and technology to support wider business and IT goals for highly intensive administration tasks.

At Wanstor we believe by enhancing internal IT services teams with improved help desk technology and outsourced IT service desk teams for high volume/admin heavy tasks, businesses can fill the skills, cost and user satisfaction gaps which exist and achieve the best possible ROI from their technology. The main reasons many business leaders are talking to Wanstor about outsourcing their IT helpdesks are:

Improved communication – Focussed on the specific needs of the business and end users

Training – Outsourced IT service desk staff specialise in providing customer support for a wide range of technologies. This means that they are trained with the latest versions of software solutions. They can also be trained to help with a business’s specific technology set up.

Cost savings – Many IT outsourcing companies provide contracts that give businesses the option to only pay for the services they need and use. An internal IT service desk is a fixed cost in terms of people and technology which needs to be provided even when the business does not require large volumes of IT support. By moving to a pay as you go IT service model, it has been proven through many extensive studies that operational costs of IT service desks can be cut by over 20% in many cases.

Outsourcing part of your IT support service will only be successful if the solution and partner you choose aligns with the specific needs of your business. It is essential that business and IT decision makers develop a plan of requirements and expectations before they engage with an IT partner. By taking the time at the outset to decide what the business actually needs from an IT support partner you can decide on whether you are looking for a partner to resolve repetitive problems like resetting passwords, or are looking for a close partnership where your IT help desk is fully supported by an external team and best in class technology.

At Wanstor we recommend all businesses do 5 things before they engage with and decide on an outsourced IT service desk partnership. They are:

  • Discuss what is going wrong with your existing IT helpdesk team and see if there are any process or people improvements which could be made to alleviate pressure and improve the service required back to the business
  • Interview a selection of end users and find out what they want/expect from an IT service desk and then evaluate if you already have the skills/capabilities to satisfy those user demands or if you definitely need some help
  • Have a vision of what you want the IT service desk to look like. Can you provide that vision with internal staff or do you need expert outside help to reach your IT and business goals. If you do want external IT support what does your ideal IT partner look like and what services should they provide?
  • Engage with a partner who can support your vision and has the expertise and experience to turn it into reality. Your partner should be able to advise you on what is realistic, and you should expect them to be able to guide you to a degree.
  • Set KPIs to judge whether your partnership is successful, it is highly valuable to measure progress. Conduct regular customer satisfaction surveys to find out whether your business users are now happier with the service they are receiving.

In summary, the traditional IT help desk model is redundant. Business technology has moved on and is still moving through its various lifecycles at a real pace. As a result, traditional IT help desks are simply unable to cope with the increased demands being placed on them. At Wanstor we believe the future IT service desk model is a hybrid one. One which uses internal IT teams for strategic high value IT programmes of work and an external provider who can look after all of the operational IT demands from users such as patching, password re-sets, application updates and making sure the right security is in place. Get the internal/external IT service provider mix right and your business could benefit from access to highly trained staff as and when it needs them, lower operational costs and improved end user satisfaction levels.

To find out more about Wanstor’s vision of the IT service desk of the future download our whitepaper here.

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6 Retail WiFi and Restaurant WiFi Challenges

27th April 2017
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Retail Restaurant WiFi Challenges

WiFi has become an important way for retail businesses and restaurants to improve their customer engagement and build a loyal following. It is also an incredibly valuable tool for you to gather your visitor metrics, better understand your customers and provide a mechanism for you to reach them easily and cheaply.  Retail WiFi and Restaurant WiFi challenges do exist though, as follows.

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