Network Monitoring for the Private Cloud: A brief guide

3rd May 2018
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Private Cloud Computing

‘Cloud computing’ as a concept has been around for over 10 years. Up until about 5 years ago many business and not for profit organisations shunned the “cloud” as all they could see were problems and challenges with the implementation of a cloud first policy such as – insufficient processor performance, enormous hardware costs and slow Internet connections making everyday use difficult.

However, today’s technology, broadband Internet connections and fast, inexpensive servers, provide the opportunity for businesses and not for profit IT teams to access only the services and storage space that are actually necessary, and adjust these to meet current needs. For many small and medium sized organisations using a virtual server, which is provided by a service provider, introduces a wide range of possibilities for cost savings, improved performance and higher data security. The goal of such cloud solutions is a consolidated IT environment that effectively absorbs fluctuation in demand and capitalizes on available resources.

The public cloud concept presents a number of challenges for a company’s IT department. Data security and the fear of ‘handing over’ control of the systems are significant issues. If an IT department is used to appropriating its systems with firewalls and to monitoring the availability, performance and capacity usage of its network infrastructure with a monitoring solution, it is much more difficult to implement both measures in the cloud. Of course, all large public cloud providers claim they offer appropriate security mechanisms and control systems, but the user must rely on the provider to guarantee constant access and to maintain data security.

Because of the challenges and general nervousness around data security in public clouds, many IT teams are investigating the creation of a ‘private cloud’ as an alternative to the use of public cloud. Private clouds enable staff and applications to access IT resources as they are required, while the private computing centre or a private server in a large data centre is running in the background. All services and resources used in a private cloud are found in defined systems that are only accessible to the user and are protected from external access.

Private clouds offer many of the advantages of cloud computing and at the same time minimise the risks. As opposed to many public clouds, the quality criteria for performance and availability in a private cloud can be customised, and compliance to these criteria can be monitored to make sure they are achieved.

Before moving to a private cloud, an IT department must consider the performance demands of individual applications and usage variations. Long-term analysis, trends and peak loads can be attained via extensive network monitoring evaluations, and resource availability can be planned according to demand. This is necessary to guarantee consistent IT performance across virtualized systems. However, a private cloud will only function if a fast, highly reliable network connects the physical servers. Therefore, the entire network infrastructure must be analysed in detail before setting up a private cloud. This network must satisfy the requirements relating to transmission speed and stability, otherwise hardware or network connections must be upgraded.

Ultimately, even minor losses in transmission speed can lead to extreme drops in performance. At Wanstor we recommend IT administrators use a comprehensive network monitoring solution like PRTG Network Monitor, in the planning of the private cloud. If an application (which usually equates to multiple virtualized servers) is going to be operated over multiple host servers (“cluster”) in the private cloud, the application will need to use Storage Area Networks (SANs), which convey data over the network as a central storage solution. This makes network performance monitoring even more important.

In terminal set ups in the 1980s, if a central computer broke down it was capable of paralyzing an entire company. The same scenario could happen if systems in the cloud fail. Current developments show that the world has gone through a phase of widely distributed computing and storage power (each workstation had a ‘full-blown’ PC) and returned to centralized IT concepts. The data is located in the cloud, and end devices are becoming more streamlined. The new cloud, therefore, complies with the old mainframe concept of centralized IT. The failure of a single VM in a highly-virtualized cloud environment can quickly interrupt access to 50 or 100 central applications. Modern clustering concepts are used to try to avoid these failures, but if a system fails despite these efforts, it must be dealt with immediately. If a host server crashes and pulls a large number of virtual machines down with it, or its network connection slows down or is interrupted, all virtualized services on this host are instantly affected, which, even with the best clustering concepts, often cannot be avoided.

A private cloud (like any other cloud) depends on the efficiency and dependability of the IT infrastructure. Physical or virtual server failures, connection interruptions and defective switches or routers can become expensive if they cause staff, automated production processes or online retailers to lose access to important operational IT functions.

This means a private cloud also presents new challenges to network monitoring. To make sure that users have constant access to remote business applications, the performance of the connection to the cloud must be monitored on every level and from every perspective.

At Wanstor we believe an appropriate network monitoring solution like PRTG accomplishes all of this with a central system; it notifies the IT administrator immediately in the event of possible disruptions within the private IT landscape both on location and in the private cloud, even if the private cloud is run in an external computing centre. A feature of private cloud monitoring is that external monitoring services cannot ‘look into’ the cloud, as it is private. An operator or client must therefore provide a monitoring solution within the private cloud and, as a result, the IT staff can monitor the private cloud more accurately and directly than a purchased service in the public cloud. A private cloud also enables unrestricted access when necessary. This allows the IT administrator to track the condition of all relevant systems directly with a private network monitoring solution. This encompasses monitoring of every individual virtual machine as well as the VMware host and all physical servers, firewalls, network connections, etc.

For comprehensive private cloud monitoring, the network monitoring should have the systems on the radar from user and server perspectives. If a company operates an extensive website with a web shop in a private cloud, for example, network monitoring could be set up as follows: A website operator aims to ensure that all functions are permanently available to all visitors, regardless of how this is realised technically. The following questions are especially relevant in this regard:

cloud-computing-lightbox

  • Is the website online?
  • Does the web server deliver the correct contents?
  • How fast does the site load?
  • Does the shopping cart process work?

These questions can only be answered if network monitoring takes place from outside the server in question. Ideally, network monitoring should be run outside the related computing centre, as well. It would therefore be suitable to set up a network monitoring solution on another cloud server or another computing centre.

It is crucial that all locations are reliable and a failover cluster supports monitoring so that interruption-free monitoring is guaranteed. This remote monitoring should include

  • Firewall, HTTP load balancer and Web server pinging
  • HTTP/HTTPS sensors
  • Monitoring loading time of the most important pages
  • Monitoring loading time of all assets of a page, including CSS, images, Flash, etc.
  • Checking whether pages contain specific words, e.g.: “Error”
  • Measuring loading time of downloads
  • HTTP transaction monitoring, for shopping process simulation
  • Sensors that monitor the remaining period of SSL certificate validity

If one of these sensors finds a problem, the network monitoring solution should send a notification to the IT administrator. Rule-based monitoring is helpful here. If a Ping sensor for the firewall, for example, times out, PRTG Network Monitor offers the possibility to pause all other sensors to avoid a flood of notifications, as, in this case, the connection to the private cloud is clearly completely disconnected.

Other questions are crucial for monitoring the (virtual) servers that are operating in the private cloud include:

  • Does the virtual server run flawlessly?
  • Do the internal data replication and load balancer work?
  • How high are the CPU usage and memory consumption?
  • Is sufficient storage space available?
  • Do email and DNS servers function flawlessly?

These questions cannot be answered with external network monitoring. Monitoring software must be running on the server or the monitoring tool must offer the possibility to monitor the server using remote probes. Such probes monitor the following parameters, for example, on each (virtual) server that runs in the private cloud, as well as on the host servers:

  • CPU usage
  • Memory usage (page files, swap file, page faults, etc.)
  • Network traffic
  • Hard drive access, free disc space and read/write times during disc access
  • Low-level system parameters (e.g.: length of processor queue, context switches)
  • Web server’s http response time Critical processes, like SQL servers or Web servers, are often monitored individually, in particular for CPU and memory usage.

In addition, the firewall condition (bandwidth use, CPU) can be monitored. If one of these measured variables lies outside of a defined range (e.g. CPU usage over 95% for more than two or five minutes), the monitoring solution will send notifications to the IT administrator.

Final thoughts

With the increasing use of cloud computing, IT system administrators are facing new challenges. A private cloud depends on the efficiency and dependability of the IT infrastructure. This means that the IT department must look into the capacity requirements of each application in the planning stages of the cloud in order to calculate resources to meet the demand. The connection to the cloud must be extensively monitored, as it is vital that the user has constant access to all applications during operation.

At the same time, smooth operation of all systems and connections within the private cloud must be guaranteed. A network monitoring solution should therefore monitor all services and resources from every perspective. This ensures continuous system availability.

For more information about Wanstor and PRTG network monitoring tools please visit – https://www.wanstor.com/paessler-prtg-network-monitor.htm

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Why flash storage is so important to the success of hybrid IT infrastructure

9th February 2018
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Why flash storage is so important to the success of hybrid IT infrastructure

IT leaders are facing critical decisions on how to best deploy data centre and cloud resources to enable digital transformation. The advantages of cloud models have been written about by many IT industry commentators, experts and opinion makers. Understandably, cloud computing is fundamental to delivering the agility, cost efficiencies and simplified operations necessary for modern IT workloads and applications at scale. However the truth is, even in today’s cloud era, IT leaders still need their own IT infrastructure and data centres to make IT work for their business.

At Wanstor, we believe that today and tomorrow’s data centres must support new models for resource pooling, self-service delivery, metering, elastic scalability and automatic chargebacks. They must deliver performance and agility that the business needs. No longer is it good enough to blame legacy IT equipment for standing in the way of business progress. IT departments must make sure they reduce complexity by leveraging technologies and architectures that are simple to deploy and manage. They must achieve levels of automation, orchestration and scalability that are not possible within data centres that operate on their own.

At Wanstor we have been thinking about the future of the data centre. We believe many IT departments are missing the fundamental question when seeking answers to their existing infrastructure plans and that is:

How does the data storage strategy integrate within existing and future company owned IT infrastructure and public cloud infrastructures?

At Wanstor we believe the answer to the “storage strategy” question can be found in a storage strategy that encompasses all flash and no longer relies on cumbersome disks and tapes. All-flash storage is the single most important change an IT Manager will need to make to successfully build their future hybrid infrastructure model. Without a flexible and scalable all-flash storage architecture the future data centre and hybrid cloud model actually fails. The performance, cost efficiencies, simplicity, agility and scalability the modern IT department will need to successfully serve their business cannot be achieved without all-flash storage as the infrastructure foundation.

So how do IT Managers leverage the benefits of all-flash storage to build a service-centric data storage infrastructure required for their business? What are some of the innovations in pricing models and all-flash storage architectures that will help them create a cost-efficient, scalable, resilient and reliable hybrid IT infrastructure?

The first thing IT Managers need to recognise is that moving to all-flash storage for a truly hybrid IT infrastructure is not just simply taking an extra step and buying some more kit nor is it rip everything out and start all over again. Instead it is an iterative process that will take place over a period of time depending on how mature a business’s IT infrastructure model is at the moment and what needs to be delivered by IT for business success in the future.

Migrating applications onto all flash storage

If you are an IT decision maker, you realise that your business has probably spent a quite a bit of budget and a significant amount of effort to make sure business critical applications are supported by an underlying IT infrastructure that is reliable, robust and resilient. Indeed you are probably beginning to experience performance challenges with a range of applications, particularly those that require high levels of IOPS. But applications and workloads that might see incremental improvements through faster, more responsive storage are unlikely to be the first place where IT will deploy all-flash systems. Instead, the IT Manager is likely to have specific applications and workloads where the performance challenges of spinning disk storage are difficult to overcome and the underlying storage infrastructure needs to be modernised instead to avoid putting the business at risk. Typical applications and workloads at this stage include databases supporting online transaction processing solutions for e-commerce, infrastructures supporting DevOps teams, and applications that are specific to a particular industry, which require levels of performance that traditional disk storage simply cannot deliver.

To understand which applications should be moved to all-flash storage first, it is important to do three things:

Understand the businesses own requirements for data storage, applications and budget considerations, and identify those workloads that are causing the most pain or providing the best opportunity to use all-flash storage to drive measurable business improvements.

Evaluate the benefits of all-flash storage solutions and how they can be applied to enhance and strengthen particular applications and workloads.

Compare leading all-flash solutions and determine which features, functions and pricing models will maximize the IT department’s ability to modernise workloads and begin a journey to an IT infrastructure model based around flash storage.

When evaluating the benefits of all flash storage, Wanstor believes IT Managers should consider the following critical factors:

Performance – All-flash storage will deliver performance that is at least 10 times greater than that of traditional disks. When thinking about performance, do not focus solely on IOPS; it is also about consistent performance at low latency. Make sure an all flash architecture is deployed that delivers consistent performance across all workloads and I/O sizes, particularly if starting with multiple workloads.

Total Cost of Ownership – The price of flash storage has come down dramatically in the past 12 months. If the IT and finance teams looked at flash several years ago and were scared off by the price, it is time to explore flash storage again. In fact some all flash storage providers have prices as low as £1k per TB of data.

Smaller storage footprint – This will happen through inline de-duplication and compression, along with thin provisioning, space-efficient snapshots and clones. In some cases the storage footprint can be reduced by a ratio of 5:1, depending upon the application and workload.

Lower operational overheads – Through faster more simple deployments, provisioning and scaling and cost savings as less manual maintenance is required.

Availability and resiliency – All-flash arrays utilise a stateless controller architecture that separates the I/O processing plane from the persistent data storage plane. This architecture provides high availability (greater than 99.999%) and non-disruptive operations. The IT Manager can update hardware and software and expand capacity without reconfiguring applications, hosts or I/O networks, without disrupting applications or sacrificing performance of the hardware.

Simpler IT operations – Many all-flash arrays are now plug and play, so simple that they can be installed in less than hour in many cases. Additionally storage administrators do not have to worry about configuration tuning and tweaking, saving hours or days of effort and associated expenses.

Consolidation – The next stage of moving more applications to flash storage

Once you have put your first applications on an all-flash storage array, the improvements in performance should be enough for the IT and finance teams to decide to invest further in the technology and really accelerate their journey to a flash storage based IT infrastructure.

Most IT leaders, will want to expand the benefits they will have seen from the initial deployment of flash storage to additional applications and workloads across the data centre. As the all-flash storage solution expands to additional applications, IT Managers will find that TCO benefits increase substantially. Because all-flash storage supports mixed workloads, IT Managers will be able to consolidate more applications on fewer devices, thus reducing IT infrastructure capital expenditure. By consolidating, IT Managers will also be able to maximize many of the cost savings mentioned earlier in this article (lower energy consumption, less floor space use, reduced software licensing fees etc).

In dense mixed workload applications, the TCO of using a flash storage solution will typically be 50% to 70% lower than a comparably configured traditional disk solution. Beyond the specific cost savings, the performance gains across more applications will drive significant business improvements and new opportunities. Resulting in a more agile IT infrastructure.

Additionally, the right all-flash storage architecture will help future-proof storage infrastructure, so that the investments being made today will continue to provide value as all flash storage usage is expanded across the business.

Building a business ready cloud on all flash storage

What do IT departments want and need from their cloud infrastructures? How can they leverage the cost savings and agility of the public cloud model, and link it to the control, security, data protection and peace of mind which can be achieved with an on-premises cloud infrastructure?

From Wanstor’s recent experiences many IT Managers want it all when it comes to cloud computing. They want to be able to provide all the features, functions and flexibility available from the leading public cloud service providers within their own IT infrastructure constraints. For many IT departments deploying cloud models similar to the big 3 cloud providers in a private cloud environment is simply unrealistic as the big 3 public cloud operators have lots of cash, resources and availability in terms of their infrastructure platforms.

If the IT department is unable to provide a better alternative to a public cloud solution, it is highly likely users within a business will feel the need to go to the public cloud. This creates a fertile ground for shadow IT initiatives that can cause security problems and other risks.

Beyond delivering public cloud-like features and functionality for an IT infrastructure solution, the IT department may also want to improve in areas where the public cloud may fall short. Performance is an example of this – If you want to use cloud services to support high-performance computing or big data analytics or some of the other important next-generation IT initiatives, it is likely the IT team will have to pay a premium to a public cloud service provider to match the businesses requirements.

Security is another critical area where building your own cloud infrastructure will give the IT department much greater control and peace of mind, particularly as they begin thinking about supporting the most important business applications and data in the cloud. As the IT department moves from the first all-flash applications through consolidation and toward the all flash cloud, an important step will be to bridge the virtualization gap between servers and the rest of the IT infrastructure, namely storage and networking.

To deliver a basic cloud-type service based on a flash storage platform, IT’s list of wants must include:

Shared resources through automated processes – Users should be able to go straight to an on-premises cloud and choose the storage capacity and performance they need, for as long as they need it.

Automated metering and charging – Once users have chosen the resources they want, the cloud infrastructure should be able to meter their usage and create an automated chargeback mechanism so they pay for what they actually used.

Scalability – Once resources are used, they go back into the pool and become available to other users and departments. As storage capacity and performance requirements grow, the storage platform should be simple to upgrade, update and scale. With virtualization across servers, storage and networking, an all-flash storage array becomes the foundation for a cloud infrastructure.

In this article we have discussed all-flash storage and the foundation it provides for a truly hybrid IT infrastructure to take place. Without the benefits of all-flash storage businesses will not be able to modernise their infrastructures to deliver cloud services. It is no coincidence that the largest cloud providers rely on all-flash storage solutions as their storage foundation. As discussed you can take the journey in stages, starting small with a single application or two, and then adding more applications through consolidation and virtualization. You can also implement multiple stages at once. Or you can do everything at once with all-flash storage solutions.

At Wanstor we believe the time for flash storage is now. The technology is great and at a price point where most businesses will see a return on their storage investments within 12 months due to the improved performance they receive across their business operations.

For more information about flash storage and how Wanstor can help your business with its IT infrastructure strategy and storage platforms, please visit https://www.wanstor.com/data-centre-storage-business.htm

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Is your private cloud strategy really working? What is your framework for success?

22nd December 2017
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Is your private cloud strategy really working? What is your framework for success?

Whether you want to take your IT operations to the public cloud, keep them on-premise, host off-premise using a private cloud model, or indeed choose to invest in a hybrid configuration, the IT Manager must start with a clear understanding of what they are trying to achieve from an IT and business perspective before embarking on their cloud journey.

This may seem like stating the obvious, but at Wanstor we have seen several cases recently where businesses have invested in cloud computing models without thinking about the outcomes they want from a cloud computing strategy.

It can be tempting to get caught up in debates and discussions about “cloud technology”, after all it is a major IT trend which lots of IT and business leaders are talking about in various online and offline publications. However just because something is a hot topic doesn’t mean the fundamental questions of business need are not addressed:

  • What are the key drivers for change?
  • Do we need to change?
  • Are we trying to reduce operational costs?
  • What do we need to do to improve the IT infrastructure environment to better support the business?
  • How can we make staff more productive through IT?
  • What is the right approach for achieving IT objectives over the next 12 months?

Obviously these are not simple questions with simple answers. As Wanstor has learned from our experience of working with 100’s of businesses across the UK on private cloud migration projects, the unique challenges of cloud computing require new ways of thinking, planning, and cross business collaboration to achieve common IT and business goals.

We’ve also seen that success can happen early in a cloud computing engagement by those IT leaders who are able to frame a realistic strategy at the beginning, which has definition and appreciation for the capabilities and limitations of the businesses they lead.

At Wanstor we say business decision makers need to have a “cloud frame of mind.” We believe a “cloud frame of mind” should be used to tackle the various strategic considerations required in a private cloud deployment project.

So let’s start at the beginning, what are you trying to do with your private cloud project?

Generally private clouds are invested in for one of 3 major business reasons:

Agility

  • Reduce time to market: Implement new business solutions quickly to accelerate revenue growth.
  • Better enable the solution development life cycle: Speed up business solutions through better development and test, and a fast path to production.
  • Be more responsive to business change: Deliver quickly on new requirements for existing business solutions.

Cost

  • Reduce operational costs: Optimize daily operational costs like people, power, and space.
  • Reduce capital costs or move to annuity-based operational costs: Benefit from reduced IT physical assets and more pay-peruse services.
  • Make IT costs transparent: Service consumers better understand what they are paying for.

Quality

  • Consistently deliver to better defined service levels: Better service leads to increased customer satisfaction.
  • Ensure continuity of service: Minimise service interruption.
  • Ensure regulatory compliance: Manage the compliance requirements that may increase in complexity with online services.

Where businesses locate their needs amongst these primary drivers and define their objectives as they consider their cloud computing options is a basic starting point in the process. For many in IT the private cloud is proving especially attractive, mainly for what it offers in terms of control over matters of security, data access, and regulatory compliance. Their primary interest in a private cloud architecture revolves around the pressures to cut costs without sacrificing control over essential data, core applications, or business-critical processes. The main secondary interests around private cloud computing are more to do with business growth and the possibilities it offers in terms of scaling workloads at different times of the year. This shows that IT leaders are beginning to think seriously about cloud computing as a way to turn IT into a business enabler rather than being seen as a costly department by other business unit leaders.

As identified above there are several drivers IT leaders are investigating as a means of reasoning to move workloads to a private cloud model. Once the IT leader has identified business needs and objectives, they should take the time to understand the capabilities, limitations, and complexities of their current IT environment, which starts by performing an analysis of technical and organisation maturity vs different capabilities of cloud computing. The next step is then to determine where you want to take your IT team and the business it is serving, and assessing the prerequisites for the desired objectives.

Many of the businesses we work with, start at a basic stage along their cloud optimisation journey. Usually they have already managed to consolidate infrastructure resources for better cost efficiencies through virtualization. If your business fits this profile, an acceptable outcome might be to advance your business to the next stage by implementing more sophisticated infrastructure level resource pooling, which would achieve still greater cost savings as well as a measure of improved time to market. Similarly, your current business capabilities may put you somewhere in the middle of the cloud maturity model, with a relatively high degree of sophistication in business areas you consider your top priorities, such as being able to respond to seasonal shifts in demand for example.

While your ultimate goal might be to bring platform as a service (PaaS) and software as a service (SaaS) architectures so you can leverage a larger set of hybrid cloud capabilities, such as anytime, anywhere access for your customers built on a unified set of compute, network, and storage resources, your near-term focus in the context of an infrastructure as a service (IaaS) model may just be in moving the dial specifically on automated provisioning and de-provisioning of resources. It’s in this approach, by making deliberate, incremental progress in the service of a longer-term strategy that real IT transformation occurs on a private cloud model.

The way forward is to recognise that changing to a functional private cloud model is an evolutionary process, where the investments you make in technology solutions must be evenly matched at each step by the maturity of your business in managing them. Your strategy must be carefully applied in those areas where your business is likely to benefit most. Indeed, not all capabilities of a private cloud need to be, or should be exploited.

The real task lies in balancing the potential goods of a private cloud solution against actual business needs, understanding your capabilities and limitations at each stage of the process, and putting a plan in place that charts a realistic, achievable course of action for getting it done.

The objectives you choose for your private cloud will raise a number of questions about the various technical and organisational implications of implementing your solution. Below are some examples of the kinds of questions IT Managers need to be able to ask in order to frame a comprehensive and realistic strategy for achieving private cloud objectives.

Self-service – Do you want to allow your users to provision the resources they need on-demand without human intervention? How much control should you relinquish? What are the potential consequences of offering a self-service model for common tasks? Will cloud computing be left unchecked and unused if individual users can select their own licences and usage limits, if so how much money will this cost the business, if accounts are left unused?

Usage-based – Pay-per-service, or “chargeback,” is one of the hallmarks of cloud computing, and if your private cloud strategy includes driving greater transparency of costs for better resource planning, you need to know the incentives you are trying to drive. Are you trying to reward good behaviour and punish bad? Do you wish to push more round-the-clock workloads to night time operations for power savings that support your company’s environmental initiatives?

Elasticity – Being able to respond efficiently to fluctuations in resource usage can represent a major selling point for cloud computing. It is important to consider first whether you really need a sophisticated system of automated provisioning and de-provisioning of servers to deal with fluctuations in demand. If significant and relatively unpredictable, then this capability may be appropriate. If the need is regular and predictable, straightforward automation may be sufficient for your purposes. Other questions you need to ask: Which applications are priorities, and which can be pushed back in terms of priorities?

Pooled resources – Consolidating resources to save on infrastructure, platform, and/or software costs is a common goal for large-scale IT operations. If you’re in a medium/large business with several independent departments potentially with their own IT operations, you are likely to encounter critical questions of process: E.g. Will independent groups deal with the inherent limitations of shared infrastructure and services? Will standardised configurations come at the cost of the optimised systems to which they’ve grown accustomed? As you move forward in the process of pooling your resources to get the benefits, you need to be aware of the likely trade-offs in putting everyone on a standard set of services. It may well be worth the cost to the business as a whole, but it may not seem that way to those who lose capabilities or levels of service to which they’ve been accustomed.

Comprehensive network access – As you move out from behind the business firewall and away from tightly controlled client configurations and network access scenarios, there are several important considerations that will need to inform your strategy, beyond the obvious concerns over security, such as the nature and extent of supportability: What kinds of personal devices will you support and to what degree? How will mobile clients (smartphones, operating systems and tablets) access network resources, and will you have the right levels of bandwidth to service them? What forms of authentication will you support?

Whatever objectives you are aiming to achieve, the important point to note is that building a private cloud is a process for which there are numerous tactical and strategic considerations. A successful private cloud implementation relies on the ability to think through all facets of the undertaking, clearly understanding the dependencies, trade-offs, limitations, and opportunities of any particular strategy. The reality for most businesses is that an incremental private cloud strategy is the only realistic path, given the technical and organisational complexity of current IT operations which exist as the business has invested large sums of money into them over a period of time.

Expectations and realities of cloud computing in a business IT context can prove a challenge to resolve. Many IT leaders understand why an incremental approach is needed, but those outside IT, are less clear about the real implications of implementing a cloud solution. The right strategy for achieving private cloud objectives must also include an appropriate communications strategy for setting and managing expectations for the business as a whole. With the whole business informed, from the board room to the front office, the hard work of defining and executing on your private cloud strategy is far more likely to achieve its objectives and set your business on the path to long-term success in the cloud.

For more information about Wanstor’s private cloud services click here.

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Adding Redundancy following Amazon Web Services (AWS) Outage

6th March 2017
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Amazon Web Services AWS S3 Outage Redundancy

Amazon Web Services (AWS) had a major outage recently that knocked a number of popular web services offline for almost a day. It turns out that it was caused by ‘human error’, where an AWS engineer was carrying out some routine maintenance and made a typo in his code that impacted a large number of servers that were used for their S3 service (Simple Storage Service). The ability to recover was then delayed as the servers had not been fully restarted in a number of years, so took more time than expected to reboot and come back online.

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8 benefits of Cloud Computing for Restaurants

31st January 2017
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8 Benefits Cloud Computing Restaurant Business

As a restaurant operator, you are no doubt always on the look out for ways to improve your processes and procedures in order to deliver sales growth, while also making efficiency and cost savings. After much hype, cloud computing is now a proven and mature way of delivering technology services to your restaurants, transforming the way your business operates and bringing benefits for all of your stakeholders.

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6 Steps for a successful Private Cloud Migration

1st March 2016
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6 Steps Private Cloud Migration

Migrating to a Private Cloud Infrastructure can feel daunting, with any move or change to your existing setup appearing fraught with danger. At the same time though, you have done all of your due diligence checks and realise that off-premise resources are the way of the future as they are cost effective, provide unprecedented levels of convenience and allow you and your team to collaborative effectively from anywhere in the world.

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